4/2/14

WWW: Sodas May Be Slowing You Down Part (II)



This anti-soda blog will be about my favorite part of the body: the oral cavity. It’s the first place any food or drink touches so I believe it can show us how good or bad something is for us.

Studies have shown that people who drink 3 or more sugary sodas a day have 62% more cavities, fillings, and tooth loss. And yet, the average American drinks more than 53 gallons of carbonated soft drinks each year, which surpasses milk, beer, coffee, and water. To make a larger number, it’s usually around 600 servings a year


Mountain Dew is by far the worst due to the sugar, caffeine, and acid count. And unfortunately, it doesn’t matter that you’re an adult with good, well-calcified enamel, you are still just as susceptible to decay. 

In fact, sodas are worse than normal sugar drinks because of the acid that tears down enamel. To set a scale for you, the pH in our mouth is usually a little more acidic than water (6.2-7). Once the pH of our oral cavity drops to a 5.2-5.5, acid begins to eat away and dissolve that hard enamel. To compare, the pH balance of a regular or diet soda ranges from 2.47-3.35. The big reason for this is the phosphoric and citric acids in those sodas. Here’s a chart to make it even more real for you.

Product
Acid
Low=BAD
Sugar
per 12 oz
Pure Water
7.00 (neutral)
0.0
Barq's
4.61
10.7 tsp.
Diet Coke
3.39
0.0
Mountain Dew
3.22
11.0 tsp.
Gatorade
2.95
3.3 tsp
Coke Classic
2.63
9.3 tsp.
Pepsi
2.49
9.8 tsp.
Sprite
3.42
9.0
Diet 7-Up
3.67
0.0
Diet Dr. Pepper
3.41
0.0
Surge
3.02
10.0
Gatorade
2.95
3.3
Hawaiian Fruit Punch
2.82
10.2
Orange Minute Maid
2.80
11.2
Dr. Pepper
2.92
9.5
BATTERY ACID
1.00
0.0


Most people would argue that this is why they drink diet sodas. That is definitely progress because you’re eliminating the sugar that causes cavities. However, the acid is still there and has the capability to breakdown enamel, which makes the tooth more susceptible to decay. 

These sticky sugars that break down into acids in your mouth will stick to the tooth surface very easily and cause more plaque accumulation, which will also erode the enamel, which again, leads to cavities. When it continues past the enamel and in to the dentin, root canals are necessary. And yet, surprisingly, soda is the primary source of sugar in the American diet.


A big cancer link has been shown through studies of carbonated drinks and esophageal cancer. This is believed to be primarily due to the burping and reflux after drinking carbonated drinks that bathe the lining of the esophagus as well as when they are swallowed.


If you still are going to drink it though, limit to one a day at meal time through a straw. Then rinse with some water and wait a bit to brush your teeth because if you brush in that high acidic environment, you can erode tooth enamel and exposed root surfaces due to recession. Also, the worst time to drink soda is when you are thirsty, because you are already dehydrated and have low levels of saliva, which makes the environment in your oral cavity even more acidic. And if you want to drink the safest one, research shows to reach for a Root Beer.


But as my last attempt to bring you to the light out of that dark soda can, here are some shocking facts:
  • ·         One 12 ounce can of regular soda contains 40 grams of sugar, 160 calories, and no nutritional value. Larger servings will add more calories and damage to the teeth and body.
  • ·         Around 20% of 1 and 2 year old children consume about a cup a day of soft drinks.
  • ·         Teenagers will drink around 3 times more soda than 20 years ago, often replacing milk and water.
  • ·         DIET SODAS HAVE MORE ACID THAN REGULAR SODA. 


No comments:

Post a Comment

About Me

My photo
BS, MS - exercise Physiology
EPC - Board Certified Exercise Physiologist

Published Thesis
The impact of three different forms of warm up on performance


The Effects of Glucose Supplementation on Barbell Velocity and Fatiguability in Weightlifting - A pilot study"

Graduate from Midwestern State University, founder of Endunamoo Barbell Club, and Endunamoo Strength and Conditioning. Working to help athletes physically reach their goals and achieve scholarships while spiritually pouring into as many people as possible on all platforms.